Step 3: Form an Organizing Committee

The Organizing Committee

The Organizing Committee is the engine that drives any organizing campaign.  The Committee must claim ownership of the campaign.

In addition to the core or primary Committee, most campaigns will include another layer of worker activists. This group, sometimes called a “task force”, an “key people”, “workplace contacts” or “campaign support group” may not meet regularly or be involved with strategic decision making but will provide the worker to worker contact and show of unity needed to win a campaign. 

Role of the Committee:

  • Provides leadership throughout the campaign
  • Educates co-workers about the benefits of working union and workers’ rights
  • Decides campaign strategies and actions
  • Distributes union materials and gets cards/petitions signed
  • Makes contact with co-workers through phone calls, home visits and personal conversations in the workplace
  • Provides feedback to staff organizers about direction of campaign and status of co-worker support
  • Gathers information about the employer, co-workers, working conditions, issues
  • Attends regular Committee meetings with strategic purpose
  • Acts as a watchdog for employer actions
  • Publicly asserts ownership of campaign (name on leaflet, buttons)


Recruitment of Committee:

  • 10% to 15% of total number of eligible employees
  • Throughout all departments, shifts and locations
  • Contains full and part time employees
  • Representative of the ethnicity, gender, age and longevity within the unit
  • Respected and trusted by co-workers
  • Influential and willing to lead co-workers
  • Good Communicator, including good listening skills
  • Good work record
  • Knowledge of the employer


What the Committee Needs to Know

  • The organizing process (including NLRB procedures and problems)
  • What to expect from the employer’s anti-union campaign
  • How to respond to co-workers questions (and fears) about dues, strikes, benefits of working union, legal rights
  • How contract bargaining works
  • Ways to build unity and keep momentum throughout campaign
  • The difference between a union and non-union workplace
  • Distribution/solicitation—workers’ rights

 

About Us

Office and Professional Employees International Union was chartered in 1945 and with more than 104,000 members (representing 110,000 employees) strong, we’re one of the larger unions of the AFL-CIO.  OPEIU has locals in every state, Puerto Rico and Canada. 

More Information
Contact Us
President's Office 
80 Eighth Avenue
(entrance at 265 West 14th Street)
20th Floor
New York, NY 10011
Phone:  (800) 346-7348